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HARDWARE MANAGEMENT CONSOLE (HMC)

Introduction to the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
The HMC is a system that controls managed systems, logical partitions, Capacity on Demand (CoD), and updates. To provide flexibility and availability, you can implement HMCs as a local HMC or a redundant HMC.

Local HMC

A local HMC is an HMC that is physically located close to the system it manages and is connected by either a private or public network. An HMC in a private network is a DHCP server for the service processors of the systems it manages. An HMC may also manage a system over an open network, where the managed system’s service processor IP address has been assigned manually using the Advanced System Management Interface (ASMI).

Remote HMC

A remote HMC is an HMC that is not physically located near its managed systems. This could be in another part of the same room or data center, in another building, or even on another site. Typically, a remote HMC would be attached to its managed servers via a public network, but configurations with a remote HMC attached to a private network are also possible. Prior to HMC version 7, at least one local HMC was required. With Version 7, any or all HMCs may be remote.

Redundant HMC

A redundant HMC manages a system that is already managed by another HMC. When two HMCs manage one system, they are peers, and each can be used to control the managed system. One HMC can manage multiple managed systems, and each managed system can have two HMCs. If both HMCs are connected to the server using private networks, each HMC must be a DHCP server set up to provide IP addresses on two unique, nonroutable IP ranges. The IBM® 7042-C06 Desktop Hardware Management Console and the IBM 7042-CR4 Rack-Mounted Hardware Management Console provide dedicated workstations designed to allow you to configure and manage servers. One HMC can manage multiple servers, and dual HMCs can provide redundant support by managing the same system. To help ensure consistent function for all 7042-C06 and 7042-CR4 HMC models, each HMC is shipped preinstalled with the Hardware Management Console Licensed Machine Code Version 7 (#0962). The Hardware Management Console Licensed Machine Code Version 7 (#0962) may also be ordered via MES for 7310 HMCs. Version 7 is not available for the 7315-C03 HMCs.

User interface style for the HMC

This HMC uses a Web-based user interface. This interface uses a tree style navigation model providing hierarchical views of system resources and tasks using drill-down and launch-in-context techniques to enable direct access to hardware resources and task management capabilities. It provides views of system resources and provides tasks for system administration.

Predefined user IDs and passwords

Predefined user IDs and passwords are included with the HMC. It is imperative to your system’s security that you change the hscroot predefined password immediately.
Tasks and roles
Each HMC user can be a member of a different role. Each of these roles allows the user to access different parts of the HMC and perform different tasks on the managed system. HMC roles are either predefined or customized. Operating systems running on logical partitions have their own set of users and roles. When you create an HMC user, you must assign that user a task role. Each task role allows the user varying levels of access to tasks available on the HMC interface. You can assign managed systems and logical partitions to individual HMC users. This allows you to create a user that has access to managed system A but not to managed system B. Each grouping of managed resource access is called a managed resource role. The predefined HMC roles, which are the default on the HMC, are as follows:

Starting the HMC

First, turn on the HMC by setting both the display and system unit to the On position. The initialization window, which includes the copyright information, is displayed. When initialization is complete, the pre-login window is displayed as shown in Figure.

 

Note: The pre-login window contains the link to log in to the HMC application,the ability to view the online help information, and the summarized status information for the HMCYou will need to log in to view the status information.

To log in to the HMC, click Log on and launch the Hardware Management Console web application. From the pre-login window. The Logon window is displayed as shown in Figure

 

To log in, enter the user ID and password combination assigned to you. Then click Logon. Note: If you previously disconnected from your session, the Choose a Disconnected Session window is displayed, select the session you want to reconnect to and click Reconnect. After you log in, the HMC workplace window is displayed and, if enabled, the Tip of the Day window appears. The HMC workplace window allows you to work with tasks for your console and managed systems. Not all tasks are available for each user ID. The user role assigned to your user ID determines what tasks you are able to perform. For example, if you are assigned a user ID with the operator role, you will have access to all the tasks that have operator access. If at any time you do not know or remember what user ID you are currently logged in to the HMC, look at the task bar on the top of the Welcome page or you can open the HMC Management node in the navigation pane, then select the Manage Users and Tasks task from the work pane

What’s new in HMC Version 7.3.1
This section highlights some of the new features and functions on Version 7.3.1 Hardware Management Console and the POWER6 platform.

Interface features
The following new Interface features include: Web-based user interface: The HMC user interface (UI) has changed from a Java® Swing implementation to a standard HTML (Web browser) implementation. There no longer is a requirement to download a separate Web-Based System Manager client to remotely connect to the HMC. When the HMC has been enabled to accept remote connections, any supported Web browser (Internet Explorer 6.0 and later or Firefox 1.5.2.0 and later) can be used as the remote console. The new UI also provides greater flexibility in how data is represented for managed systems and partitions through the sorting and filtering functions. In addition, custom groups can be created to provide essentially any structure over the managed objects (servers, frames, and partitions).

Status bar
This feature provides quick visual feedback of the overall system status, including serviceable events and System Attention indicators.

User task management
This task displays all of the users that are currently logged in to the HMC and which tasks they are running. A user with HMCsuperadmin privileges can cancel the running tasks of other users and can also log off other users from the system.

Disconnect/Logoff
This feature allows a user to either log off the HMC or disconnect temporarily. When a user chooses the logoff option, all of the currently running tasks for that user are terminated. However, if a user chooses the disconnect option all currently running tasks for that user continue to run without interruption. When that user logs back in to the HMC they can either return to that previously disconnected session or start a new session.

Test Network Connectivity
This task allows a user to view network diagnostic information for the HMC. The task provides an interface to ping other IP addresses or hostnames and view various network protocol settings. For example, the routing information for the HMC can be accessed using this task.

Manage Data Replication
This task enables or disables customized data replication. Customized data includes the following HMC configuration settings: Customer information data, user defined custom group data, modem configuration data, and outbound connectivity data.

HMC Server Command Line

In these examples, replace ‘pSeries’ with the name of your pSeries machine and replace ‘LPAR Name’ with the name of your LPAR .

List the names of all pSeries connect to the HMC lssyscfg -r sys -F name
List the names and serial numbers of all pSeries connect to the HMC lssyscfg -r sys -F name,serial_num
List the processor capabilities of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries –level sys -r proc
List the memory capabilities of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries –level sys -r mem
List the processor pools of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries -r procpool
List the Virtual SCSI adapters of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries -r virtualio –rsubtype scsi –level LPAR
List the virtual Fibre Adapters of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries -r virtualio –rsubtype fc –level LPAR
List the real adapter details of a pSeries server lshwres -m pSeries -r io –rsubtype slot
List the LPAR s current running processor settings lshwres -m pSeries -r proc –level LPAR  –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name
List the LPAR s current running memory settings lshwres -m pSeries -r mem –level LPAR  –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name
List the LPAR s name, state and LPAR  id for a pSeries server lssyscfg -r LPAR  -m pSeries -F name,LPAR _id,state
List the LPAR s current profile name lssyscfg -r LPAR  -m pSeries -F curr_profile –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name
List the LPAR s default profile name lssyscfg -r LPAR  -m pSeries -F default_profile –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name
List the LPAR s profile settings lssyscfg -m pSeries -r prof –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name,profile_names=LPAR profile
List the LPAR s settings lssyscfg -m pSeries -r LPAR  –filter LPAR _names=LPAR name
Change the LPAR  attributes to allow performance statistics collection chsyscfg -m pSeries -r LPAR  -i “LPAR _id=18,allow_perf_collection=1″
or this deprecated option:
chsyscfg -m pSeries -r LPAR  -i “LPAR _id=18,shared_proc_pool_util_auth=1″
Show all the LPAR s boot codes lsrefcode -m pSeries -r LPAR
Show one LPAR s boot codes lsrefcode -m pSeries -r LPAR  –filter LPAR _ids=25
Show the LED state lsled -m pSeries -r sa -t virtualLPAR
Power on an LPAR  with normal boot option chsysstate -m pSeries -r LPAR  -o on -b normal -f ProfileName -n LPAR Name
Power on an LPAR  with SMS boot option chsysstate -m pSeries -r LPAR  -o on -b sms -f ProfileName -n LPAR Name
Power off an LPAR  with the OS command chsysstate -m pSeries -r LPAR  -o osshutdown -n LPAR Name
Power off an LPAR  immediately chsysstate -m pSeries -r LPAR  -o shutdown –immed -n LPAR Name
Open a console window mkvterm -m pSeries -p LPAR Name
Close a console window rmvterm -m pSeries -p LPAR Name
Create a basic VIO server profile
This is all typed on one line.
mksyscfg -m pSeries -r LPAR  -i “name=id22_vios22,LPAR _id=22,LPAR _env=vioserver, profile_name=normal,min_mem=1024,desired_mem=2048,max_mem=4096, proc_mode=shared,min_procs=1,desired_procs=2,max_procs=4, min_proc_units=0.5,desired_proc_units=1,max_proc_units=2, sharing_mode=uncap,uncap_weight=248, \”io_slots=21010018//1,21030016//1,21040017//1\”"
Create a basic VIO client profile
This is all typed on one line.
mksyscfg -m pSeries -r LPAR  -i “name=client8,LPAR _id=8,LPAR _env=aixlinux, profile_name=normal,min_mem=32768,desired_mem=65536,max_mem=131072, proc_mode=shared,min_procs=1,desired_procs=10,max_procs=20, min_proc_units=0.5,desired_proc_units=6,max_proc_units=10, sharing_mode=uncap,uncap_weight=64, \”virtual_serial_adapters=0/server/1/any//any/1,1/server/1/any//any/1\”, max_virtual_slots=20″
Create some server Ethernet adapters
This is all typed on one line.
chsyscfg -m pSeries -r prof -i “LPAR _name=id22_vios22,name=normal, \”virtual_eth_adapters=\”\”16/1/4014/445,446,447/2/1/ETHERNET0\”\”, \”\”15/1/4013/430,431,432/1/1/ETHERNET0\”\”\”"
Where:
Field1 = Server Slot
Field2 = IEEE Trunking – 0 = Off, 1 = On
Field3 = Adapter PVID
Field4 = Adapter VLANs
Field5 = Trunk Priority
Field6 = Required (1) or Desired (0)
Create some client Ethernet adapters
This is all typed on one line.
chsyscfg -m pSeries -r prof -i “LPAR _name=client8,name=normal, \”virtual_eth_adapters=\”\”11/0/407//0/1/ETHERNET0\”\”, \”\”12/0/406//0/1/ETHERNET0\”\”,\”\”13/0/405//0/1/ETHERNET0\”\”\”"
Where:
Field1 = Client Slot
Field2 = IEEE Trunking – Always 0 on clients
Field3 = Adapter PVID
Field4 = Adapter VLANs – Always blank on clients
Field5 = Trunk Priority – Always 0 on clients
Field6 = Required (1) or Desired (0)
Create a Virtual SCSI server adapter
This is all typed on one line.
chsyscfg -m pSeries -r prof -i “LPAR _name=id22_vios22,name=normal, \”virtual_scsi_adapters=20/server/8/client8/10/1\”"
Where:
Field1 = Server slot.
Field2 = server.
Field3 = Remote VIO Client LPAR  id.
Field4 = LPAR  name adapter is reserved for.
Field5 = Client slot.
Field6 = 0 – Not required, 1 – Required.
Create a Virtual SCSI client adapter
This is all typed on one line.
chsyscfg -m pSeries -r prof -i “LPAR _name=client8,name=normal, \”virtual_scsi_adapters=10/client/22/id22_vios22/20/1\”"
Where:
Field1 = Client slot.
Field2 = client.
Field3 = Remote VIO Server ID.
Field4 = VIO Server LPAR .
Field5 = Server slot.
Field6 = 0 – Not required, 1 – Required.