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VIOS FAQS

Initialize the LPAR Configuration :

#mkgencfg -o init

[OS] Software Management :

To display VIO Server level:

# ioslevel

To update the IOS software:

# updateios –dev /update -

To installs a new filesets (mainly used for TL updates):

# updateios –dev /cd0 -install -accept

To commit all applied :

# updateios –commit

To rejects all uncommitted updates :

# updateios –reject

To clean all incomplete pieces of the preVIOus installation :

# updateios –clean

To remove a fileset :

# updateios –remove fileset_name

To take the OS backup in a CD ROM :

# backupios –cd /dev/cd1 -cdformat

To take the OS backup in a DVD-RAM :

# backupios –cd /dev/cd1 -udf

To take the OS backup in a tape drive :

# backupios –tape /dev/rmt0

Just verifies the backup available in a tape :

# backupios –tape /dev/rmt0 -verify

Generates backup to a file. No user VGs are -nosvg back’d up :

# backupios –file /opt/file1

To display the underlying AIX OS version :

# oem_platform_level

To open a non-restricted root shell :

# oem_setup_env

This shell is used mainly for the installation of vendor software such as device drivers.

Remote Management :

To enable remote_management using NIM master :

# remote_management nim1

To disable remote management :

# remote_management –disable

License Management:

To display the current license :

# license –view

To accept the license :

# license –accept

To view if the license has been accepted :

# license

Software Management:

To list all the installed software :

# license

To list all the installed software and their history

# license –hist

Management of Virtual Terminals:

To open a virtual terminal for partition with id 2 :

# mkvt –id

To close a virtual terminal for a partition with id 2 :

# rmvt –id 2

Device Management:

To change the attribute of a device permanently.

# chdev -dev scsi0 -attr -perm

Sometimes it reboots the system if perm is used

To disable the path between hdisk1 and scsi0 :

# chpath -dev hdisk1 -pdev scsi0 -op disable

To configures the devices in the VIO server :

# cfgdev

To configures the devices attached to scsi0 adapter :

# cfgdev –dev

To unconfigure the cd-rom device :

# rmdev –dev cd0

To unconfigure scsi adapter and its child devices :

# rmdev –recursive –dev scsi1

To unconfigures the children of pci1 but not the PCI bus pci1 :

# rmdev –pdev pci1

Management of Virtual/Shared Devices:

To create a virtual target device that maps lv20 as a virtual disk for a client partition hosted by the vhost0 virtual server adapter :

# mkvdev -vdev lv20 -vadapter vhost0

Same as above except here hdisk is used instead of a logical volume :

# mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost2

To create a SEA that maps the physical Ethernet adapter ent4 as a virtual adapter for the client

partitions served by the virtual Ethernet adapters ent6 and ent7, using ent6 as the default adapter and 8 as the default id :

# mkvdev -sea ent4 -vadapter ent6,ent7 -default ent6 -defaultid 8

To remove a virtual target device vtscsi9 along with its backing lv :

# rmvdev –vdev vtscsi9 –

To remove all virtual target device associated with backing device lv001 :

# rmvdev –vdev lv001

To remove a specific virtual target device :

# rmvdev –vtd vtscsi10

List Device Mapping:

To list all virtual target devices and backing devices mapped to virtual server adapter vhost2 :

# lsmap -vadapter vhost2

To list SEA and physical device mapped to virtual Ethernet Adapter ent4 :

# lsmap -vadapter ent4 –net

To list all virtual target devices and backing devices where backing devices are of type LV :

# lsmap -all -type lv

To list all network mapping :

# lsmap –all –net

How to list Devices :

To display all the devices :

# lsdev

To display all the virtual devices :

# lsdev –virtual

To display all the virtual adapters :

# lsdev –type adapter –virtual

To display all the slots :

# lsdev –slot s

To display all the adapters :

# lsdev –type adapter

Few other device types: disk, lv, optical, tape, tty

To list all physical Ethernet adapters and Etherchannel available for creating a SEA :

# lsdev –type ent4sea

To list all virtual Ethernet adapters available for creating a SEA :

# lsdev –type ven4sea

To list all adapters over which ip address can be configured :

# lsdev –type ent4ip

To display parent device of a device :

# lsdev –dev hdisk0 –

To list disks names and physical location alone :

# lsdev -type disk -field name physloc

Logical Volume Manager :

Volume Group

To create a vg on hdisk1 :

# mkvg -vg newvg hdisk1

To drain I/O’s for a vg and suspends future I/O’s :

# chvg -suspend vg03

To resume normal I/O operations for a vg :

# chvg -resume vg03

Unlock a VG if left in a locked state by abnormal termination of another lvm operation :

# chvg -unlock vg03

To add a physical volume to a volume group :

# extendvg vg3 hdisk3

To remove a PV from a VG :

# reducevg vg01 hdisk1

To remove a PV and all residing LVs from a VG with no confirmation :

# reducevg –rmlv –f vg01

To activate a vg :

# activatevg vg03

To deactivate a vg :

# deactivatevg vg03

To mirror the VIO Server’s rootvg to hdisk4 and reboots VIO Server :

# mirrorios –force hdisk4

To mirror the VIO Server’s rootvg to hdisk4 but don’t reboot the server :

# mirrorios –defer hdisk4

To remove the rootvg mirror from hdisk4 :

# unmirrorios hdisk4

To import a VG from hdisk07 :

# importvg –vg vg001 hdisk07

To export a VG :

# exportvg vg3

Note: Volume Group containing a paging space can’t be exported

To sync a VG :

# syncvg –vg vg01

To sync a LV :

# syncvg –lv lv001

To sync a PV :

# syncvg –pv hdisk4 hdisk5

To redefine a VG based on the VGDA from hdisk04 :

# redefvg –dev hdisk04

Logical Volume :

To create a logical volume of size 1MB in vg01 :
#  mklv  –lv lv001 vg01 1M hdisk1

To create a logical volume with mirror in place in vg01 of size 1GB :

#  mklv  –mirror vg01 1G

To extend an LV by 3MB :

# extendlv lv01 3M

To extend an LV by 1GB with space taken from hdisk5 :

# extendlv lv01 1G hdisk5

To remove a logical volume :

# rmlv lv05

To display the properties of a logical volume :

# lslv lv03

To display info about LV by Physical volume :

# lslv –pv lv03

To display LVs that can be used as backing devices :

# lslv –free

To make a copy for lv01 in hdisk03 :

#  mklv copy lv01 hdisk03

To remove lv01’s copy from hdisk03 :

# rmlvcopy lv01 hdisk03

To copy the contents of lv01 to lv02 :

# cplv lv01 lv02

To copy the contents of lv01 to a new lv in vg01 :

# cplv –vg vg01 lv01
To change the name of oldlv to newlv :

# chlv –lv newlv oldlv

Physical Volume

To display all physical volumes in the system :

# lspv

To display the status and characteristics of hdisk03 :

# lspv hdisk03

To list all the available PVs used as virtual SCSI backing devices :

# lspv –avail

To list PVs that can be used as virtual SCSI backing devices and are not currently a backing device :

# lspv –free

To move physical partitions from hdisk1 to hdisk2 :

# migratepv hdisk1 hdisk2

To move physical partitions in lv01 from hdisk1 to hdisk2 :

# migratepv –lv lv01 hdisk1 hdisk2

Storage Pool Management:

To create storage pool “client_data” using hdisk3 hdisk4 hdisk3 and hdisk4 :

# mksp -f client_data

To set client_data storage pool as default :

# chsp –default client_data

To list all storage pools :

# lssp

To list the default storage pool :

# lssp –default

To list the backing device in rootvg storage pool :

# lssp –bd –sp rootvg

To attach a storage from a storage pool to a Virtual SCSI adapter:

# mkbdsp -bd lv001 -vadapter vthost2 -tn vtscsi9

To removes storage from a Virtual SCSI adapter, and removes the backing device :

# rmbdsp –bd lv001

To remove storage from a Virtual SCSI adapter, And makes sure backing device is not deleted :

# rmbdsp –bd lv001 -savebd

To removes storage from a Virtual SCSI adapter, and removes the backing device :

# rmbdsp –vtd vtscsi9

To removes storage from a Virtual SCSI adapter. and makes sure backing device is not deleted :

# rmbdsp –vtd vtscsi8 -savebd

Network Configuration :

TCP/IP Configation:

To configure tcpip on a network interface :

# mktcpip -hostname sys01VIO2 -inetaddr 9.47.90.113 -interface en2 -netmask 255.255.255.0 -gateway 9.47.90.1 -nsrvdomain yahoo.com -start

-

To display the stored tcp/ip configuration in the system :

# lstcpip –stored

To display ethernet adapters on the system :

# lstcpip –adapters

To display the system hostname :

# lstcpip –hostname

To display DNS name servers in search order and domain name :

# lstcpip –namesrv

To display the routing table :

# lstcpip –routtable

To display routing table in numeric output instead of hostname :

# lsctpip –num –routtable

To display all the open inet sockets :

# lstcpip –sockets –family inet

To display the status of all configured interfaces :

# lstcpip –state

To remove all TCP/IP configuration :

# rmtcpip –all

To unconfigure tcpip in en0:

# rmtcpip –interface en0

To cleanup static routing table :

# rmtcpip –f -routing

To remove IP information from en0 after reboot :

# rmtcpip –f –interface en0 -nextboot

To remove DNS information and clears the hosts file :

# rmcpip –namesrv

Managing IP address-to-host name Mapping Entries:

To add IP address-to-host name mapping entry :

#  hostmap -addr 192.100.1.7 -host alpha

To list all IP address-to-host name mapping entries :

#  hostmap –ls

To delete the IP address-to-host name mapping entry :

#  hostmap-rm 192.100.1.7

Managing Network Services:

To enable all the network services :

#  startnetsvc ALL

To enable the telnet daemon :

#  startnetsvc telnet

To enable the ftp daemon :

#  startnetsvc ftp

To enable the ssh daemon :

#  startnetsvc ssh

To enable the ldap daemon :

#  startnetsvc ldap

To enable the cimserver daemon :

#  startnetsvc cimserver

To enable the xntpd daemon :

#  startnetsvc xntpd

To send CLI tracing details to the system log :

#  startnetsvc tracelog

To send system error to the system log :

#  startnetsvc errorlog

To disable all the network services :

#  stopnetsvc  ALL

To disable the telnet daemon :

#  stopnetsvc  telnet

To disable the ftp daemon :

#  stopnetsvc  ftp

To disable the ssh daemon :

#  stopnetsvc  ssh

To disable the ldap daemon :

#  stopnetsvc  ldap

To disable the cimserver daemon :

#  stopnetsvc  cimserver

To disable the xntpd daemon :

 stopnetsvc  xntpd

To stop sending CLI tracing details to system log :

#  stopnetsvc  tracelog

To stop sending system error log to the system log :

#  stopnetsvc  errorlog -

To display the status of ftp network service :

# lsnetsvc ftp

Managing DNS, Domain and Search Order Entries:

To add a domain entry :

# cfgnamesrv -add -dname abc.aus.century.com

To add a name server entry :

# cfgnamesrv –add -ipaddr 192.9.201.1

To display all the DNS entries :

# cfgnamesrv -ls

Network Tuning Parameters:

To display the maximum size of the mbuf pool :

# optimizenet –get thewall

To set a machine as internet work router over TCP/IP networks :

# optimizenet –set ipforwarding=1

To display information on udp_recvspace :

# optimizenet –h udp_recvspace

Network Monitoring:

To display all the statistics, including the device- specific statistics :

# entstat ent0

To reset all the statistics back to their initial values :

# entstat –reset ent0

To display the route to a particular host :

# traceroute nis.nsf.net

System Monitoring :

To display the summary of current system activity :

# sysstat

To display the system statistics :

# topas

System Management Commands:

To halt the operating system :

# shutdown

To halt the operating system forcibly :

# shutdown –force

To reboot the VIO server :

# shutdown –restart

To invalidate the boot list for service mode :

# bootlist -mode service –rm

To display the boot list for service mode :

# bootlist -mode service –ls

To set the boot list for normal mode :

# bootlist –more normal hdisk0

To display the complete detailed error report :

# errlog –ls

To remove all the error log entries :

# errlog –rm 0

To remove the error log entries older than 5 days :

# errlog –rm 5

To change the system date and time :

# chdate -day 12 -month 10 -year 2004 -hour 16 -minute 30

To change the language for the entire system to French Canadian :

# chlang -lang fr_CA

To display available languages :

# chlang –ls

To perform hardware problem determination and maintenance :

# diagmenu

To generate report on microcode levels of all the devices :

# invscout –report

To display the vpd survey of the partition :

# invscout –vpd

To append the current MOTD [Message Of The Day] :

# motd –append “Message”

To overwrite MOTD :

# motd –overwrite -file filename

To do the initial configuration of VIO Server :

# cfgassist

It is like configuration assitant in AIX.

To do filesystem scan :

# fsck /dev/lv01

To display exported (nfs) directories on a remote server :

# showmount hostname

To start system dump on the primary device :

# startsysdump

To display continuous disk report on disk1 at 2sec interval :

# VIOstat -disk disk1 2

To display adapter throughput reports :

# VIOstat –adapter

To display system and adapter throughput reports :

# VIOstat –sys –adapter

To gather system info and to store it in the floppy disk :

# snap -general -dev /dev/rfd0

To display microcode levels of all devices :

# lsfware –all

Managing Agents:

To start an agent : # startsvc agent_name

To stop an agent: # stopsvc agent_name

To display an agent’s configuration information :

# lssvc agent_name

To display all the available agents :

# lssvc

To display the attributes associated with ITSM_base agent :

# cfgsvc –ls ITM_base

To display the ITM_base agent ssh public key :

# cfgsvc -key ITM_base

User Management:

To create a user :

# mkuser

To change an attribute of a user :

# chuser

To display the properties of a user :

# lsuser

To remove a user from the system :

# rmuser

To set/reset password for a user :

# passwd

Security Commands:

To display all failed logins :

# lsfailedlogin

To display the contents of global command log :

# lsgcl

To displays high system settings :

# VIOsecure -level high
To apply all of the high system settings to the system :

# VIOsecure -level high –apply

To displays the current system settings :

# VIOsecure –view

To allow IP activity on the ftp-data, ftp, ssh, www, https, rmc, and cimon ports, and to deny other IP activity :

# VIOsecure –firewall on

To enable IP activity on all ports :

# VIOsecure –firewall off

To display the list of allowed ports :

# VIOsecure -firewall view

Redundancy configuration using virtual fibre channel adapters
Redundancy configurations help protect your network from physical adapter failures as well as Virtual I/O Server failures.

With N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV), you can configure the managed system so that multiple logical partitions can access independent physical storage through the same physical fibre channel adapter. Each virtual fibre channel adapter is identified by a unique worldwide port name (WWPN), which means that you can connect each virtual fibre channel adapter to independent physical storage on a SAN.

Similar to virtual SCSI redundancy, virtual fibre channel redundancy can be achieved using Multi-path I/O (MPIO) and mirroring at the client partition. The difference between traditional redundancy with SCSI adapters and the NPIV technology using virtual fibre channel adapters, is that the redundancy occurs on the client, because only the client recognizes the disk. The Virtual I/O Server is essentially just a pipe. The second example below uses multiple Virtual I/O Server logical partitions to add redundancy at the Virtual I/O Server level as well.
Example: Host bus adapter failover
This example uses Host bus adapter (HBA) failover to provide a basic level of redundancy for the client logical partition. The figure shows the following connections:

      • The storage area network (SAN) connects physical storage to two physical fibre channel adapters located on the managed system.
      • The physical fibre channel adapters are assigned to the Virtual I/O Server and support NPIV.
      • The physical fibre channel ports are each connected to a virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server. The two virtual fibre channel adapters on the Virtual I/O Server are connected to ports on two different physical fibre channel adapters in order to provide redundancy for the physical adapters.
      • Each virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server is connected to one virtual fibre channel adapter on a client logical partition. Each virtual fibre channel adapter on each client logical partition receives a pair of unique WWPNs. The client logical partition uses one WWPN to log into the SAN at any given time. The other WWPN is used when you move the client logical partition to another managed system.

The virtual fibre channel adapters always has a one-to-one relationship between the client logical partitions and the virtual fibre channel adapters on the Virtual I/O Server logical partition. That is, each virtual fibre channel adapter that is assigned to a client logical partition must connect to only one virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server, and each virtual fibre channel on the Virtual I/O Server must connect to only one virtual fibre channel adapter on a client logical partition.

Host bus adapter failover

The client can write to the physical storage through client virtual fibre channel adapter 1 or 2. If a physical fibre channel adapter fails, the client uses the alternative path. This example does not show redundancy in the physical storage, but rather assumes it would be built into the SAN.

Note: It is recommended that you configure virtual fibre channel adapters from multiple logical partitions to the same HBA, or you configure virtual fibre channel adapters from the same logical partition to different HBAs.

Example: HBA and Virtual I/O Server failover
This example uses HBA and Virtual I/O Server failover to provide a more advanced level of redundancy for the client logical partition. The figure shows the following connections:

      • The storage area network (SAN) connects physical storage to two physical fibre channel adapters located on the managed system.
      • There are two Virtual I/O Server logical partitions to provide redundancy at the Virtual I/O Server level.
      • The physical fibre channel adapters are assigned to their respective Virtual I/O Server and support NPIV.
      • The physical fibre channel ports are each connected to a virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server. The two virtual fibre channel adapters on the Virtual I/O Server are connected to ports on two different physical fibre channel adapters in order to provide redundancy for the physical adapters. A single adapter could have multiple ports.
      • Each virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server is connected to one virtual fibre channel adapter on a client logical partition. Each virtual fibre channel adapter on each client logical partition receives a pair of unique WWPNs. The client logical partition uses one WWPN to log into the SAN at any given time. The other WWPN is used when you move the client logical partition to another managed system.

HBA and Virtual I/O Server failover

The client can write to the physical storage through virtual fibre channel adapter 1 or 2 on the client logical partition through VIOS 2. The client can also write to physical storage through virtual fibre channel adapter 3 or 4 on the client logical partition through VIOS 1. If a physical fibre channel adapter fails on VIOS 1, the client uses the other physical adapter connected to VIOS 1 or uses the paths connected through VIOS 2. If VIOS 1 fails, then the client uses the path through VIOS 2. This example does not show redundancy in the physical storage, but rather assumes it would be built into the SAN.
Considerations
These examples can become more complex as you add physical storage redundancy and multiple clients, but the concepts remain the same. Consider the following points:

      • To avoid configuring the physical fibre channel adapter to be a single point of failure for the connection between the client logical partition and its physical storage on the SAN, do not connect two virtual fibre channel adapters from the same client logical partition to the same physical fibre channel adapter. Instead, connect each virtual fibre channel adapter to a different physical fibre channel adapter.
      • Consider load balancing when mapping a virtual fibre channel adapter on the Virtual I/O Server to a physical port on the physical fiber channel adapter.
      • Consider what level of redundancy already exists in the SAN to determine whether to configure multiple physical storage units.
      • Consider using two Virtual I/O Server logical partitions. Since the Virtual I/O Server is central to communication between logical partitions and the external network, it is important to provide a level of redundancy for the Virtual I/O Server. Multiple Virtual I/O Server logical partitions require more resources as well, so you should plan accordingly.
      • NPIV technology is useful when you want to move logical partitions between servers. For example, in active Partition Mobility, if you use the redundancy configurations above, in combination with physical adapters, you can stop all the I/O activity through the dedicated, physical adapter and direct all traffic through a virtual fibre channel adapter until the logical partition is successfully moved. The dedicated physical adapter would need to be connected to the same storage as the virtual path. Since you cannot migrate a physical adapter, all I/O activity is routed through the virtual path while you move the partition. After the logical partition is moved successfully, you need to set up the dedicated path (on the destination logical partition) if you want to use the same redundancy configuration you had configured on the original logical partition. Then the I/O activity can resume through the dedicated adapter, using the virtual fibre channel adapter as a secondary path.

IOS – Information and Maintenance
 1. List all ioscli commands

help

You can type

help <command>

to display a command’s syntax, e.g

help lsmap
Usage: lsmap {-vadapter ServerVirtualAdapter | -plc PhysicalLocationCode |
-all} [-type BackingDeviceType ... | -net]
[-field FieldName ...] [-fmt delimiter]
Displays the mapping between physical and virtual devices.

-all Displays mapping for all the server virtual adapter
devices.

-vadapter Specifies the server virtual adapter device
by device name.

-plc Specifies the server virtual adapter device
by physical location code.

-type Specifies to display virtual devices whose backing
device matches the type given.

-net Specifies supplied device is a virtual server
Ethernet adapter.

-field Specifies a list of fields to be displayed.

-fmt Divides output by a user-specified delimiter.

2. IOS Version

ioslevel
1.5.2.1-FP-11.1
3. Apply IOS Fixes

Put the IOS fixes somewhere in a local directory or on an NFS server (e.g. /mnt/iosfixes). Then run

updateios -dev /mnt/iosfixes -accept

4. Reboot the VIO Server

shutdown –restart

Virtual Devices: Storage

1. List unmapped disks

lspv -free
NAME PVID SIZE(megabytes)
hdisk24 none 8631
hdisk25 none 8631
hdisk26 none 8631
hdisk27 none 8631

Warning:
If you use vendor specific device drivers (such as the SDD or EMC drivers) you see all
hdisks as free. You have to limit the list to your logical devices, e.g.

lspv -free | grep vpath

2. List all Disk Mappings

lsmap -all

SVSA Physloc Client Partition ID
————— ——————————————– ——————
vhost1 U9117.570.65E12FB-V1-C102 0x0000000a

VTD vtscsi1
LUN 0×8100000000000000
Backing device hdisk6
Physloc U7879.001.DQDHXYN-P1-C4-T1-W50050763041302AA-L4021400000000000

VTD vtscsi8
LUN 0×8200000000000000
Backing device hdisk14
Physloc U7879.001.DQDHXYN-P1-C4-T1-W50050763041302AA-L4031400100000000

3. Create a Virtual SCSI Host Adapter

This has to done on the HMC for the profile of the VIO server: You create a new
Virtual SCSI Host-Adapter and assign it only to your client LPAVIOS Profile: Add Virtual SCSI Adapter

The same slot ID should then be assigned to a new client adapter in the client LPAR’s profile.

You can do these steps dynamically to avoid a restart of the VIO server. Use the Dynamic Logical Partitioning
option for that. If you go for the dynamic option don’t forget to do the same assignments in the profiles aswell,
otherwise your LPAR loses all storage after a new start of the VIOS!

After dynamically adding the server hostadapters you have to rerun the configuration mamager before you
can see the new vhost device:

cfgdev

4. Remove a Virtual SCSI Host Adapter

rmdev -dev vhostX [ -recursive ]

The option »-recursive« can be used to remove all still attached child devices.

Then remove the adapters dynamically from the VIO server aswell as from the VIOS’ profile.

5. Assign a Disk/LV to a Virtual SCSI Host Adapter

To map hdisk22 to vhost1 just type

$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk22 -vadapter vhost1
vtscsi19 available
The VIO server assigns the next free number (19 here) and creates the mapping device
vtscsi19. But you can specify your own name for the mapping device by making use of the
»-dev« option:

$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk22 -dev vthdisk22_barney -vadapter vhost1
vthdisk22_barney available
If you use LVs rather than whole disks or LUNs the same rules apply:

# default mapping device

$ mkvdev -vdev LPAR21_lv03 -vadapter vhost1
vtscsi19 available

custom mapping device
$ mkvdev -vdev LPAR21_lv03 -dev vtdisk21_lv03 -vadapter vhost1

vtdisk21_lv03 available
6. Unassign a Disk/LV from a Virtual SCSI Host Adapter

rmvdev -vtd vtscsiXX

Virtual Devices: Network

1. List Shared Ethernet Adapters

lsmap -all -net
SVEA Physloc
—— ——————————————–
ent12 U9117.570.65E12FB-V2-C20-T1

SEA ent13
Backing device ent3
Physloc U7311.D20.651372C-P1-C01-T2
2. Create a Shared Ethernet Adapter

To create a Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA) you need:

      • a physical adapter as backend: <PHYS>
      • a virtual adapter as defined in the VIOS’ profile: <VIRT>
      • an internal VLAN ID: <VLAN>

If you use the Shared Ethernet Adapter Failover capability of recent IOS releases you also need

      • a second virtual adapter as defined in the VIOS’ profile: <CONT>

for the control channel:

simple:
$ mkvdev -sea <PHYS> -vadapter <VIRT> -default <VIRT> -defaultid <VLAN>

Shared Ethernet Adapter Failover:
$ mkvdev -sea <PHYS> -vadapter <VIRT> -default <VIRT> -defaultid <VLAN> -attr ha_mode=auto ctl_chan=<CONT>
Example: To create a Shared Ethernet Adapter on top of an virtual adapter ent11 using
VLAN 20, the physical adapter ent2 as backend, and the virtual adapter ent13 for the
control channel type:

$ mkvdev -sea ent2 -vadapter ent11 -default ent11 -defaultid 20 -attr ha_mode=auto ctl_chan=ent13

3. List Links on Physical Ethernet Adapters

netstat -cdlistats | grep -Ei “\(ent|media|link status”
ETHERNET STATISTICS (ent3) :
Link Status : Up
Media Speed Selected: 100 Mbps Full Duplex
Media Speed Running: 100 Mbps Full Duplex
4. Set an local IP Address

To configure an local IP 192.168.1.2 address to en0 use

mktcpip -hostname <HOSTNAME> \ -inetaddr 192.168.1.2 \ -interface en0 -start \ -netmask 255.255.255.0 \ -gateway <GATEWAY>

5. Remove an local IP Address

If you want to remove the IP configuration from en0, type

rmtcpip -interface en0